RUSSELLVILLE, ARK. — Archeologists from across the Natural State will descend on the Ozark-St. Francis National Forests in June to conduct investigations at archeological sites along the Mulberry River as part of their annual training program June 10-25.

On Saturday, June 17, an open house to tour the archeology lab and visit one of the sites is planned at Cass Job Corps, near Ozark, Ark from 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM. The Open House will provide the public an opportunity to learn about the annual training program and current research.

“We’re thrilled to partner with the U.S. Forest Service and Cass Job Corps in hosting our 54th annual training program,” said Dr. George Sabo, Director of the Arkansas Archeological Survey.

The Arkansas Archeological Society was formed in 1960 to unite people interested in the archeology of Arkansas, to recognize and preserve cultural heritage and prehistory, and to foster and encourage the public’s interest in the preservation of the past. The Annual Training Program began in 1964 under the direction of archeologists at the University of Arkansas Museum, but has been under the supervision of the Arkansas Archeological Survey since 1967.

The Arkansas Archeological Survey is part of the University of Arkansas (UA) System and focuses on studying and protecting archeological sites in Arkansas, preserves and manages information and collections from those sites, and then shares that information with Arkansans. Cooperative agreements with seven state university campuses, two state parks, and the UA System’s Winthrop Rockefeller Institute enable scholars at ten research stations around the state to carry out this work. It has been a model for statewide archeological programs in the United States and around the world.

The annual training program has previously been held on both National Forests in Arkansas. “These partnerships extend our research capacities significantly, enabling us to accomplish a great deal of work in a short amount of time. It’s a great example of the values of citizen science,” says Dr. Sabo.

For information about joining the Arkansas Archeological Society please visit http://www.arkarch.org/. For more information about the Arkansas Archeological Survey, please visit http://archeology.uark.edu/.